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Having A Boy: Third Times a Son

3 min read

I’m becoming a dad for the third time.

You’d think by now the thought of it becomes easier. The nappies, early mornings, sleepless nights, not able to lay in my king size bed next to my wife…I’m currently still doing it all. However, now it’s a little different. Because now, I’m having a son.

I have two beautiful girls and they are amazing, and now with a son on the way I almost feel another level of responsibility to show him the way and guide him into making the right choices. Which is pretty simple. Don’t break girl’s hearts and making sure I have another Hawks supporter, is a lock!

I wasn’t the greatest kid growing up and I occasionally got into trouble as we all do. I lost a few mates along the way, didn’t do well at school and have made some financial choices that have me looking back thinking, “why the hell would you do that”!?

This boy is the new challenge that I’m faced with and it’s kinda scary. My girls are very strong and independent which I’m very proud of and still only 8 and 2. They pretty much run the household now and have me wrapped around their little fingers. They know if Mum says “No” that Fun Dad will likely say “Yes”. He is always ready for tea parties and being dressed up. I know I’m doing well, when I come home from work and they cling to me like they haven’t’ seen me for a lifetime.

What worries me is; ‘Will my kids be able to cope with the cyber bullies?’ ‘Will they be more switched on with school and not get picked on?

With my little man on the way, I can only remember what it was like for me growing up as a boy. I have the fist hand experience. I was good at sports but always just that bit too small or short to really make it. I was skinny and wasn’t the brightest in the class. This had a huge impact on my confidence. I did have a lot of friends and the girls liked me as well so it wasn’t all bad but I was constantly faking it.

Coming into my teens I used to get picked on or bullied for being a pretty boy by my mates and my first years of high school were dreadful.

I never spoke about this…

Now I’m 35, I still have confidence issues, which no one really knows about and it stems back to my youth.

As parents we all want the best for our sons and daughters (of course who wouldn’t?!)  What worries me is; ‘Will my kids be able to cope with the cyber bullies?’ ‘Will they be more switched on with school and not get picked on? ‘Will my son be tall enough for the dating / sporting world or will my genes be too dominant?

There are still the same thoughts even with my 3rd child on the way. It doesn’t get easier, if anything it gets more challenging but at the same time, all the more rewarding.

There is no manual to raise kids. We only go off how we were raised by our parents and then you splash in your morals and mix this with a bit of fun and pretty much see where it takes you.

The fact is I just want to be a role model for my son and teach him not to make the same mistakes I did growing up. There were plenty of them but this also means I can offer plenty of advice.

The hardest part about being a dad/parent is that you want it all to be easier for your kids and that thought in itself is crazy, life is not easy. It’s meant to be a journey that we travel with our children so they can pass on that knowledge and experience to their children and so on (Wow, am I a philosopher now?)

In saying all of this, I love being a dad: the hugs, kisses, laughter, silly games, rolling around on the floor playing stacks on, taking the kids to sport and the beach and Christmas gets better each year! It’s like reliving your childhood all over again.

So even after telling you my story I’m still a little scared but at the same time I’m excited and In a few weeks get to hang out with my lil son.

I’ll keep you all posted – stay tuned!

Rob Chappell

Written by Rob Chappell

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